How important are your teeth for health?

How important are your teeth?

Most of the time, we see teeth as a tool for chewing food and an aesthetic aspect of our appearance, however, there are other very important reasons for teeth that usually gets overlooked.

“Malocclusion has much to do with our childhood developmental years”

Necessity of Correct Occlusion.

Occlusion is a term for teeth that fit or bite together snugly, when the jaws are closed and malocclusion is when the teeth are not in proper contact when the jaws are closed.

Here are a few reasons why malocclusion is present:

There is an over or under bite between the upper jaw called maxilla and lower jaw called mandible. 

This has much to do with our childhood developmental years pertaining to our physical movement, dietary intake and other lifestyle factors, relating to how we experienced the outer world throughout those earlier years. However, those deeper perspectives will be for teeth blog part 2.

To ease in gently and simply, I’ll explain the mechanical functions of the teeth first.

‘Each tooth is individually specific to its adjoining bodily parts and if those teeth have malocclusion, the related organs will be functionally compromised.’

 Each tooth has contact points, also called cusps, that fit together rather like a zipper being zipped.

These cusps, when in correct alignment, create nerve impulses or signals that travel along the nerves to muscles, organs, glands and other bodily parts. (These nerves can be called meridians or neuromechanical circuits)

The impulses stimulate or invigorate the connecting tissues, generating energy to enhance their metabolic functions and performance. Each tooth is individually specific to its adjoining bodily parts, meaning the two upper and lower front teeth are associated to kidneys and bladder. If those front teeth have malocclusion, the related organs, to some degree, will be functionally compromised from the lack of impulses being transmitted.

This functional role and responsibility of the teeth can be deemed a valuable input of health and wellbeing, which can get undervalued or overlooked.

Not only are missing teeth an influence on health, but the teeth that have malocclusion are also diminishing health levels.

A Personal Story

As a child, I had an issue with a tooth located in the upper right third molar from the back, which I eventually lost in my early teens after some efforts to save were in vain.

In my late 20s, after much self abuse, self neglect and alcohol addiction, I contracted chronic pancreatitis which almost ended my life.

In overcoming this trauma, finding my purpose and healing back from a broken body, mind and spirit, I came to discover that lost tooth was connected to the pancreas. Go figure, that lost tooth compromised the functional capacity of the pancreas, thus becoming the weakest biological link within the system.

As we are aware, not too long ago, dentists would happily remove teeth as a solution to the problem, rather than making all efforts to save them as they do now. Not only are missing teeth an influence on health, but the teeth that have malocclusion are also diminishing health levels.

As those teeth are still part of your mouth, they can be realigned to reinstate proper occlusion and improve health.

Save your teeth at all costs and align them; now you have a better appreciation of their value and important role.

Author: EsoWD

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